4 Reasons You May Not be Losing Weight While Training for Your First Marathon

February 19, 2016

Related Topics: Athletes, Community, Wellness

Picture1 Ryan Light, a PROBAR Ambassador and avid runner, shares some reasons why running more often can actually lead to weight gain.

 Marathon training: Why is it so hard to lose weight?

You’ve trained long and hard for your first half-marathon, and then even harder for your full marathon. You’ve been eating well and following a sensible carb-loading diet but when you step on the scale you find that there is a weight gain. How is this possible? How can someone who runs and trains at your level gain weight during marathon training?

This weight gain is not uncommon, in fact it has a name, and marathon training induced weight gain and occurs most frequently in novice or recreational marathoners and for a variety of reasons. Below are four possible reasons why you are gaining weight, even though you feel like you’re exercising more than ever before.

Muscle Weighs More than Fat

Muscle is denser and as a result weighs more than fat. But wait, doesn’t a pound of fat weigh the same as a pound of muscle? Yes, but a pound of muscle takes up less space than a pound of fat. If you are slimmer and trimmer than before you began marathon training, but weigh more, your new muscle in your new body takes up less space than the fat did but weighs more. If you are gaining weight but losing inches, you are on the right path.

You Might Not be Eating at the Right Time

But if your training is causing weight gain AND adding inches to your waistline, you may need to adjust your diet. Long runs and extended training sessions and your actual races cause you to be hungry. That’s normal, it’s called rebound hunger. But then there is the “I ran x miles today, I deserve a pizza, heck I deserve a beer and a pizza, maybe a pizza and a pitcher…” That’s called a calorie reward and soon leads to celebratory fat. Both of these cases result in extra pounds. This ravenous hunger can also be caused by skipping your post-training recovery nutrition window. You may not feel like feeding your body immediately after your run, but it is the optimal time to feed your depleted muscles and skipping this window will result in that feeling of starvation later.

Sugary Drinks Can Lead to Weight Gain

In your healthy attempt to stay hydrated throughout the entire day, are you drinking extra sugar and calories? Colas, sodas, concentrated juices, milk, coffee specialty drinks and wine are loaded with hidden syrups and sugars. If you are thirsty, drink water. Save those sports drinks for immediately before, during and after extended training sessions lasting more than an hour or during extreme heat. The carbs (sugar) in these drinks are designed to replace and replenish glycogen stores during and after training, but if not used for that purpose they are converted and stored as fat.

Initial Water Weight

Speaking of glycogen, it’s the reason athletes (marathon runners in this case) follow a high-carbohydrate diet and carb-load before intense exercise or prior to extended endurance events. Your body converts carbs to glycogen and stores it in muscle and your liver. As a distance runner, you are now a glycogen converting and storing machine! But, glycogen is said to be hydrophilic and has a strong affinity (attraction) to water molecules. Where glycogen goes, water follows, sometimes as much as 2-3 grams for each single gram of glycogen. This is a temporary water weight gain that diminishes as your body’s glycogen stores are used to fuel your run, but can easily account for 3-5 pounds of your weight gain!

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So, if you find that you have gained weight over your training cycle, take heart as we all have. Another way to ensure that you get the most out of your training is to fuel up with the right products. Eating some delicious bolt energy chews or a fruity meal bar during a run, or a base bar afterwards can help make sure you have what it takes to finish your run and recover in time for the next one.

For more of Ryan’s articles and running tips, be sure to check out his website