Traveling the World in Search of First Ascents

April 10, 2015

Related Topics: Athletes, On The Road

PROBAR athlete Kyle Dempster recently returned from China and New Zealand. He checks in with some words and photos recapping his recent 3 month adventure.

Wow, that was a long one! So many beautiful places in the world!! China and New Zealand, wow, such a contrast of worlds. Frigid in the Chinese Himalaya with temps as low as -40! Managed some first ascents and drove nearly 4500 kilometers through the Tibetan boonies.



Cholla 2, roughly 6200m



Bruce Normand on a new route and the second ascent of Cholla 2, Ganze, Tibet



Food. A great reason to visit China. A country of culinary expeditioning



Bruce Normand climbing in the Kawagebo Range on the border of Tibet and Sichuan, China



More delicious food in China



On the summit of an unclimbed ~6100m peak in the Daxue Shan, Minya Konka, Sichuan, China



On the summit of an unclimbed ~6100m peak in the Daxue Shan, Minya Konka, Sichuan, China



Our chariot. The Buick that we drove nearly 5000km through Tibet, Sichuan, and Yunaan. In our 6 weeks in China we explored 5 different mountain ranges. Climbing, -40 degree temps, police officers, and lots of ProBars were all enjoyed, maybe with the exception of the law enforcement


New Zealand was spectacular and I was there mostly for a photography/work trip with Outdoor Research. However it turned out to be much more adventurous than was expected. Jewell, my girlfriend, and I managed a 300-meter first ascent in a remote mountain range called the Darrans. This place is known for having over 300 days of rain a year, but we nailed it with a 5-day splitter weather window. STOKED!



Jewell Lund climbing the vertical jungle in the Darran Mountains, South Island, New Zealand



The nice thing about a strong girlfriend is that she always asks to carry the pack!



300 days of rain a year in the Darran Mountains. We were lucky to enjoy 5 days of sunshine and climb a new route on Karatai Peak



Descending from Karatai Peak